Last edited by Malmaran
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

3 edition of Military societies of the Crow Indians. found in the catalog.

Military societies of the Crow Indians.

Lowie, Robert Harry

Military societies of the Crow Indians.

by Lowie, Robert Harry

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Published by American Museum of Natural History in New York .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Microfiche. Ann Arbor, Mich., University Microfilms, 19--. 1 microfiche. 11 x 15 cm. (Human relations area files, HRAF)

The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationp. 143-217 p.
Number of Pages217
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15135087M

  There were lots of fierce tribes that were never conquered but you won't find us in history books. The U.S. has never been good at acknowledging defeat. My tribe is a militaristic tribe culturally. Were more conservative than most and strictly dis. From to he told his story of Crow life and wars to William Wildschut, an ethnologist with the Museum of the American Indian This is the poignant story of the end of traditional Crow life and attitudes, which Two Leggings saw ending with the last warfare rather than the death of the buffalo."—Pacific Historian.

Though military or other societies are often associated with this police duty the selection process varie d from tribe to tribe. "Among the Crow, police duties were associated in irregular order with one or another of the tribal military societies; among the Blackfoot two or three of the military societies . Plains Horn and his family (Cheyenne) with a horse and travois, c. – According to Crow, he used his rifle to knock the weapon out of his opponent’s hands. All Crow would have had to do then was aim his own gun and pull the trigger.

military societies, american indian. Competition and social powwows have become an integral and important part of American Indian life in Oklahoma. These gatherings feature several styles of dancing and are held almost on a weekly basis throughout the state. The Tobacco society of the Crow Indians. Anthropological papers of the AMNH ; v. 21, pt. 2. Download directly to your device’s book reader (e.g., iBooks) or drag into your e-books collection on your computer. This item appears in the following Collection(s).


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Military societies of the Crow Indians by Lowie, Robert Harry Download PDF EPUB FB2

Excerpt from Societies of the Crow, Hidatsa and Mandan Indians Dance and Clowns have been included for purposes of comparison with other tribes. My interpreters were t he same to whom acknowledgment has already been made in the introduction to my Social Life of the Crow Indians, but the work on military societies was conducted more particularly with the assistance of Author: Robert H Lowie.

Military societies of the Crow Indians. [Robert Harry Lowie] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create Book\/a>, bgn:Microform\/a>, schema:CreativeWork\/a>. Military Societies of the Crow Indians --Societies of the Hidatsa and Mandan Indians.

Series Title: Anthropological papers of the American Museum of Natural History, v. The Crow began to suffer high losses from the Blackfoot and Dakota Sioux as the American colonial frontier expanded and drove those tribes into Crow country.

In response to constant threats from these enemies, the Crow sided with the U.S. military in the Plains wars of the s and ’70s. Crow (trans., through French gens des corbeaux, of their own name, Absároke, crow, sparrow hawk, or bird people).A Siouan tribe forming part of the Hidatsa group, their separation from the Hidatsa having taken place, as Matthews () believed, within the last years.

He studied at the College of the City of New York. Inhe became assistant curator at the American Museum of Natural History, New York. During his time there, Lowie became a specialist in American Indians. In fact, Lowie became an authority on the Crow Indians.

Inhe became assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Book digitized by Google and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Reprint of v.

11 of Anthropological papers of the American Museum of Natural History, published in. An illustration of an open book.

Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software An illustration of two photographs. Full text of "Societies of the Crow, Hidatsa and Mandan Indians". Home» Browse» Sociology and Anthropology» Cultures and Ethnic Groups» Native American Culture and Society» Crow Indians.

Crow Indians Crow Indians: Selected full-text books and articles. Myths and Traditions of the Crow Indians By Robert H. Lowie University of Nebraska Press, PS.

Kangi'yuha or Crow Owners society One of the societies whose members were chosen to serve as Aki'cita, Crow Owners or "those that owned the crow," were proven and successful warriors. They emulated the crow, who was always first to arrive and take advantage of the carcus of a dead animal or a dead warrior on the battlefield.

Hidatsa, (Hidatsa: “People of the Willow”) North American Indians of the Plains who once lived in semipermanent villages on the upper Missouri River between the Heart and the Little Missouri rivers in what is now North Dakota.

The Hidatsa language is a member of the Siouan language family. Until. The Crow men were divided into men's military societies such as Foxes, Lumpwood, Crazy Dogs, Big Dogs, and Ravens. Membership in the societies was open to any proven warrior.

The societies, each having its own rules and customs, competed to recruit the most promising young men. The book was published in New York City and London in as The Life and Adventures of James P.

Beckwourth: Mountaineer, Scout and Pioneer, and Chief of the Crow Nation of Indians. A translation was published in France in Early historians of the Old West originally considered the book little more than campfire lore.

It has since been. Inthroughand again inRobert H. Lowie left behind academic anthropology to live among the Crow Indians, listening to the old men and women tell of times gone forever.

He learned much about what had been, and still was, a society remarkable for its variability and cohesion, and for its resistance to the encroachments of white civilization.

In Edward Curtis's The North American 4 (Apsaroke, Hidatsa) there's the picture of a Crow Indian called Red Wing: described as it follows: Red Wing - Ahpishshish (sorry, couldn't manage with diacritics) - Born about - Piegan Lodge clan - Lumpwood society (this is one of the two most important Crow military societies or clubs, the other being that of the Fox).

There was a soldier, a leader of one of the societies, the Bow String Society. His name was Two Twist. Two Twist made a vow, a pledge that he would lead the tribe against the Crow.

The Crow were divided into thirteen exogamous matrilineal clans and six phratries. There were also named military and social societies, with membership through election. The camps were governed by a council of esteemed warriors and a head chief, who achieved this status through succesful military.

This book is a history and cultural overview of the Crow tribe of southern Montana and northern Wyoming. It's topics are broad, from inter-tribal warfare to descriptions of buffalo jumps (herding buffalo off of cliffs to make hunting them easier) to a dry, witty humor recounted in the Crow Humor chapter/5(11).

The principal war society, however, has resulted from a fusion of the warriors or war societies of all the clans of the Hopi pueblos except one. Besides the two war societies, and two societies devoted to the curing of diseases, all of these brotherhoods devote themselves to bringing rain.

This short book is comprised of several short stories and anecdotes from the Crow perspective. Beginning with the creation of the Crow people, the book offers brief sections on Crow society such as Crow social organization, military organization, religion, economy, language, and physical appearance.

Societies of the Crow, Hidatsa and Mandan Indians [Lowie, Robert Harry] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Societies of the Crow, Hidatsa and Mandan Indians.The Crow are also called the Apsáalooke, Absaroka, and Apsaroke. Their name was given them by the Hidatsa, and meant “people [or children] of the large-beaked bird.”Historically, they lived in the Yellowstone River Valley.

A Siouan tribe, they once were part of the Hidatsa, living around the headwaters of the upper Mississippi River in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin.The Tobacco Society of the Crow Indians book.

Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. The Tobacco Society of the Crow Indians book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.

The Tobacco Society of the Crow Indians book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.